• incosmetics Barcelona 2015

  • Principals from around the globe

  • Principals from around the globe

  • Principals from around the globe

  • Principals from around the globe

  • Principals from around the globe

Organic Colorants

Colorants are classified as either organic or inorganic depending on the chemistry. Organic colors were originally called ,,coal tar“ or ,,ani-lines“ because they were derived from coal sources. However, nowadays almost all organic colorants are synthetic and are available as either water soluble, oil soluble or insoluble (=Lakes) agents in all kinds of shades. In the US approved organic colors are designated as FD&C, D&C or Ext. D&C. This means:

FD&C: certified for use in food, drugs & cosmetics

D&C: certified for use in drugs & cosmetics including in those in contact with mucous membranes and those that are ingested External D&C: certified for use in drugs & cosmetics that do not come in contact with mucous mem-branes or those that are ingested.

Inorganic Colorants

Inorganic colorants are composed of insoluble metallic compounds which are either derived from natural sources (e.g. china clay, carbon deposits) or are synthesized. Inorganic colors do not have the same kinds of health risks as organic colors and, therefore do not require certification. Unfortunately, inorganic colorants are not available in the range of shades that the organic offers, and they are not water soluble which limits their range of applications. Below is a list of the different groups of inorganic colorants (suppliers offer various shades).

Selecting Colorants Based on Regulations

There are many factors that determine the appropriate colorant choice. Pay attention to the following before using a colorant:

Products that do not come into contact with mucous membranes or the eye area (e.g. shampoo, conditioner, hand cream): use FD&C, D&C or Ext. D&C colors

Products that are used around the mouth (e.g. face cream, lipstick): use FD&C or specifically approved D&C colors

Products that are used around the eye (e.g. mascara, eye shadow): use only inorganic or natural colors or specifically approved organic colors (e.g. FD&C Yellow 5). Some natural colors that are not allowed like henna, silver, or lead acetate.

Selecting Colorants Based on Formulation

Color selection depends also on the properties of a formulation. As a rule of thumb:

Liquid products (e.g. shampoo, lotion): use water-soluble D&C or FD&C colors.

Solid products (e.g. powders): use inorganic or insoluble organic colors (Lakes). Keep in mind that the same amount of a specific colorant may give a different shade in a different formulation.